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We’re proud to be taking part in the “Bras for a Cause” event again, aiming to raise $100,000 for our neighbors with cancer. Bras for a Cause is organized by the Oregon Cancer Foundation and is a really fun and creative way to donate to a worthy cause. Here’s how it works:

  • Individuals, groups, and companies have created a fun and themed “bra”
  • The public (you!) can vote on your favorite design or creation
  • It costs just $1 (you’ve surely got that in your couch cushions or vehicle dashboard) to cast a vote
  • Voting runs Oct 1- Oct 31
  • You can vote as many times as you want
  • The money stays in Lane county to provide financial assistance to women fighting cancer.  You can go online to vote or bring cash to the finance office and we will vote for you.

This year’s theme is “Breast in Show”, and you can see the bras on display at the Bras for a Cause website… which is awaiting your votes!

Click here to vote!

Here’s a look at the bra we created:

Make sure you vote for your favorite by clicking here. 

We’d like to wish all of our patients, family, and friends a happy 2019 International Women’s Day!

The theme for 2019 is “Think Equal, Build Smart, Innovate for Change”. This year’s theme inspires us to ask “what can I do to make a difference?”

Thinking big and acting locally is a great start.

We especially love this quote from the International Women’s Day campaign: 

Right now is a great and important time in history to do everything possible to help forge a more gender-balanced world. Women have come a long way, yet there’s still more to be achieved. From grassroots activism to worldwide action, we are entering an exciting period of history where the world expects balance. We notice its absence and celebrate its presence.

Hello friends and patients, this is a notice that due to the Winter storm, our clinic is closed today, Tuesday February 26, 2019. Depending on how the weather changes, we may or may not be closed tomorrow (Wednesday). Please make sure to call ahead of time to see if we’re open: (541) 342-8616

Multiple Cases of Measles have been identified in the Vancouver/Portland area, increasing the risk for Lane County!

Area hospitals are restricting access to Labor and Delivery as well as Postpartum to persons over the age of 12 to limit the potential risk of Measles exposure to infants. 

In order to decrease exposure to others: Anyone who might show symptoms of measles should call for medical advice before going to an emergency department, doctor’s office, urgent care office, or the Public Health Department. 

The symptoms of measles generally appear about seven to 14 days after a person is infected. Measles typically begins with a high fever, cough, runny nose and red, watery eyes. Two or three days after symptoms begin, tiny white spots may appear inside the mouth. Three to five days after symptoms begin, a rash breaks out. It usually begins as flat red spots that appear on the face at the hairline and spread downward to the neck, trunk, arms, legs and feet. Small raised bumps may also appear on top of the flat red spots. When the rash appears, a person’s fever may spike to more than 104° Fahrenheit. After a few days, the fever subsides and the rash fades.

Photo credit

We’re proud to be taking part in the “Bras for a Cause”, aiming to raise $100,000 for our neighbors with cancer. Bras for a Cause is organized by the Oregon Cancer Foundation and is a really fun and creative way to donate to a worthy cause. Here’s how it works:

  • Individuals, groups, and companies have created a fun and themed “bra”
  • The public (you!) can vote on your favorite design or creation
  • It costs just $1 (you’ve surely got that in your couch cushions or vehicle dashboard) to cast a vote
  • Voting runs Oct 1- Oct 31
  • You can vote as many times as you want
  • The money goes directly to patients in Lane County

Click here to vote!

Here’s a look at the bra we created:

Make sure you vote for your favorite by clicking here. 

There are many methods to prevent pregnancy that work well and are easy to use. Significant advances in birth control options make it easier than ever for women to take control of their reproductive health.

Women can now choose many non-surgical options such as birth control implants, patches, pills, shots, vaginal rings and cervical caps, among other options. Permanent surgical options include Essure and tubal ligation.

What is the Birth Control Implant?

The birth control implant is called Nexplanon. It is implanted in the upper arm. This birth control works by delivering the hormone progestin. It works continuously for up to 3 years with more than 99% effectiveness. With the implant in place, the woman does not need to do anything else, unless she decides that she wants to get pregnant. The implant can be removed. Once the implant is placed, it doesn’t need to be changed or maintained until the 3 year period is up or the patient decides that she wants to get pregnant. The implant can be removed and the woman can become pregnant quickly after removal. Nexplanon does not prevent STDs, so use condoms along with the implant for STD prevention.

What is the IUD?

The Intrauterine Device (IUD) is a birth control method that is implanted in the uterus. The IUD is as effective as the implant and can also be removed. There are two distinct kinds of IUDs. ParaGard works through the use of the metal copper while a progestin containing IUD works through a small dose of hormone delivered into the uterus. Progestin containing IUDs can stay in place for up to 3-5 years while ParaGard lasts up to 10 years. IUDs do not prevent STDs, so use condoms along with the IUD.

What’s New with Oral Contraceptives?

Oral contraceptives are commonly called “the pill.” Dosages and side effects of the pill have been minimized with new advances. Though today’s pills contain much less hormones than in years past, they are still up to 99% effective. The most common complaint about the pills is that you must remember to take it every day. Missed pills reduce the effectiveness considerably. This option requires a person make a commitment to take it and have a regular schedule. The pills do not prevent STDs, so use condoms along with the pills.

What Is the Birth Control Patch?

Women wear the birth control patch on bare skin on a part of the body such as the belly, upper arm, or back. While it is applied it releases hormones that prevent pregnancy the patch is worn 3 weeks on and then removed for 1 week. Patches do not prevent STDs, so use condoms along with the patches.

What Is the Birth Control Shot?

Depo-Provera is the birth control shot. It is given every three months. The shot delivers the hormone progestin to prevent pregnancy. The shot must be given on the correct schedule in order to prevent pregnancy. Depending on where you are in your cycle when you first get the shot, you may need to use another form of birth control to prevent pregnancy for the first week until it begins to work. Shots do not prevent STDs, so use condoms along with the shots.
Less effective methods are the condoms and spermicides. These methods deliver between 71% and 86% effectiveness. Using condoms with these methods greatly increases their effectiveness. The benefit of these methods is that they do not deliver any hormones.

There are many options for safe, effective birth control today. Talk to your doctor about what method would work best for you!

September is PCOS Awareness Month. PCOS stands for Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome. Many women have PCOS but not every woman knows they have it. PCOS is a syndrome in which a woman’s hormones are out of balance. PCOS can affect many aspects of a woman’s health, from her menstrual cycle, acne and to extra hair growth on the face.

Most women with PCOS develop numerous small cysts on their ovaries. That is why it is called polycystic ovary syndrome.

Symptoms of PCOS

Symptoms of PCOS may include any or all of the following:
Infertility
Irregular menstrual cycles
Increased hair growth on the face, chest, stomach and other places where women typically do not grow hair
Ovarian cysts – The cysts are not harmful but lead to hormone imbalances
Increased acne
Baldness or thinning hair
Pelvic pain
Too much insulin
Depression or mood swings
Weight gain

The hormone imbalances that are part of PCOS can contribute to many of these symptoms because there is more testosterone. Hormones affect a woman’s menstrual cycle, hair growth, mood, and appearance.

Causes of PCOS and Treatments

There is no known cause for PCOS. It may be genetic and it seems to run in families. To make a diagnosis of PCOS, your doctor will talk with you about the variety of symptoms you’re having. He or she may use an ultrasound to observe cysts on your ovaries. Blood tests can detect a high level of androgens and check for blood sugar levels in your blood, which may indicate insulin resistance.

Because extra weight contributes to several of the symptoms of PCOS, a healthy diet and exercise routine are important. Pre-diabetes and diabetes are a concern. Extra weight can lead to heart trouble, difficulty sleeping, depression, or sleep apnea. Many of the symptoms of PCOS are inter-related.

If you are experiencing more than one of these symptoms, talk with your doctor at Pacific Women’s Center. Diagnosis and treatment of PCOS can help manage your symptoms.